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How to be a more dynamic supervisor

Jason Roscoe
22nd February 2023
09.30 to 16.30 (UK)

Attend this workshop live and enjoy the interactive session, or if you can't make the date we'd love you to join us on the recording.  Recordings are available for 3 months after the event to registered delegates and include all resources and materials.

 

How to be a more dynamic supervisor
Abstract

Being an effective supervisor requires a range of skills that shift continually, based on the present needs of the supervisee. This means placing more or less emphasis on normative, formative or restorative functions across supervision sessions. Research suggests that routine supervision practices over-rely on verbal case discussion, and this can limit opportunities for more active and experiential methods such as role-play, chair work or self-practice of CBT methods.

Being a dynamic supervisor involves both anticipating supervisee's preferences and challenges and responding to supervision questions flexibly. It also involves dealing with impasses or ruptures with curiosity, compassion and self-awareness using a variety of CBT informed approaches to keep supervision on track. Supervisors may lack the knowledge or confidence to be more dynamic in their work with supervisees therefore this workshop will seek to equip both novice and experienced supervisors with a range of skills to improve their skills in this area.


Key learning objectives:


By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:


Recognise the core functions of CBT supervision and describe standard and creative methods to achieve them


Have an awareness of a range of tools that can be used to pre-empt and respond to difficulties within the supervisory system


Understand how their own therapist schemas influence their beliefs about supervision and behaviour as a supervisor or supervisee


Apply bespoke formulation to the supervisory relationship to help make sense of the origins and maintaining factors of certain supervision interfering beliefs and behaviours 


Key references


  • Roscoe, J. (2021a). Maximizing trainee cognitive behavioral therapists use of clinical supervision: Can a bespoke workshop help to broaden their horizons? Journal of Applied Psychology and Social Science, 6(1), 58–89

  • Roscoe, J. (2021b). Conceptualising and managing supervisory drift. The Cognitive Behaviour Therapist, 14, E37. doi: 10.1017/S1754470X21000350

  • Roscoe, J., Taylor, J., Harrington, R., & Wilbraham, S. (2022). CBT supervision behind closed doors: Supervisor and supervisee reflections on their expectations and use of clinical supervision. Counselling and Psychotherapy Research, 00, 1–12. https://doi.org/10.1002/ capr.12572

  • Roscoe, J & Taylor (under review) Maladaptive therapist schemas in CBT practice, training and supervision: A scoping review


About Jason Roscoe


Jason Roscoe is a Senior Lecturer in CBT at the University of Cumbria where he is deputy programme director for an IAPT course.  Jason is also a BABCP accredited Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapist and Supervisor and supervisor trainer who  has been carrying out research on supervisory drift, role transition difficulties during CBT training and the detection and management of maladaptive therapist schemas. He has presented nationally and internationally on interpersonal processes in supervision and published five peer-reviewed papers relating to the topics of CBT supervision and training.

 

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